Life After Life by Kate Atkinson

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for review consideration.

Title: Life After Life
Author: Kate Atkinson
Publisher: Reagan Arthur Books
Expected Release: April 2, 2013
Source: publisher (NetGalley)

Synopsis:

What if you could live again and again, until you got it right?

On a cold and snowy night in 1910, Ursula Todd is born to an English banker and his wife. She dies before she can draw her first breath. On that same cold and snowy night, Ursula Todd is born, lets out a lusty wail, and embarks upon a life that will be, to say the least, unusual. For as she grows, she also dies, repeatedly, in a variety of ways, while the young century marches on towards its second cataclysmic world war.

Does Ursula’s apparently infinite number of lives give her the power to save the world from its inevitable destiny? And if she can — will she?

Darkly comic, startlingly poignant, and utterly original — this is Kate Atkinson at her absolute best.

When I first read the synopsis of Kate Atkinson’s Life After Life, I immediately wondered how Ursula Todd would come back to life. Would it be like Captain Jack Harkness in the television series Torchwood, where moments after death she’d revive with a huge gasp for air? Would it be more like the movie Groundhog Day, with all the frustration that came with not being able to escape the loop? Would she be aware of what was happening? Would other people be aware of it happening to her? No matter how many possibilities I envisioned, I was still surprised by the way Kate Atkinson crafted this plot point. It is handled with ingenuity and originality; never cheesy, never trite. I’m purposely being vague here, because I don’t want to spoil it for anyone. But I think every time I feel déjà vu in the future, I’ll be reminded of this novel…

Much of the story took place in London during the bombings (the “Blitz”) of WWII. These pages were terrifying and heart-wrenching. I would start to feel overwhelmed and think, “Is this ever going to stop?” I’d want to put the book down for a while, and then feel guilty. I’d been reading over the course of only two days, and could take a break whenever I wanted. London had 57 nights in a row of bombings. Atkinson gives readers an incredibly vivid portrayal of war, a poignant and multifaceted look at its enormity and how distressing – and wearying – it is for all involved.

Life After Life is beautifully written and reads like a classic. Wonderfully complex, it’s a story you could read over and over and always make new connections.

This title will be released by Reagan Arthur Books, an imprint of Little, Brown and Company, on April 2, 2013.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive any other compensation for this review.

  • Oh wow! You got to read this book already–lucky you! Thanks for stopping by my blog.