The Color Master by Aimee Bender

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for review consideration.

Title: The Color Master
Author: Aimee Bender
Publisher: Doubleday
Expected Release: August 13, 2013
Source: publisher (NetGalley)

Synopsis (from Goodreads):

In this collection, Bender’s unique talents sparkle brilliantly in stories about people searching for connection through love, sex, and family—while navigating the often painful realities of their lives. A traumatic event unfolds when a girl with flowing hair of golden wheat appears in an apple orchard, where a group of people await her. A woman plays out a prostitution fantasy with her husband and finds she cannot go back to her old sex life. An ugly woman marries an ogre and struggles to decide if she should stay with him after he mistakenly eats their children. Two sisters travel deep into Malaysia, where one learns the art of mending tigers who have been ripped to shreds.

In these deeply resonant stories—evocative, funny, beautiful, and sad—we see ourselves reflected as if in a funhouse mirror. Aimee Bender has once again proven herself to be among the most imaginative, exciting, and intelligent writers of our time.

I should state up front that Aimee Bender is one of my favorite authors, right up there with Haruki Murakami. Even though I knew I’d likely fall in love with this new collection of short stories (and I did!), I was blown away by the extent of her versatility and imagination in The Color Master. From teenagers at the mall in “Lemonade” to ogres in “The Devourings,” each of the fourteen stories is set in its own fantastical world with its own voice, tone, and set of rules.

The title story, “The Color Master” was by far my favorite. This is a spin-off of the French fairytale “Donkeyskin” by Charles Perrault. It was a little more plot-driven than the others, yet had a beautiful, glittery air of magic to it. The tailors had to make dresses the color of the sun, the moon, and the sky (!!!)… pretty incredible.

This collection is reminiscent of fables of old, containing social commentary and deeper lessons to be learned. Bender definitely has a surrealist bent, so read these offbeat, eccentric stories knowing that, in some cases, you may be waking up before the dream is completely over!

As much as I relished each story, I was still surprised by how astonishingly bizarre and avant-garde they are. If you are new to Aimee Bender’s work, you may want to read The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (novel) and Willful Creatures (short stories) first.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive any other compensation for this review.