The Remedy by Thomas Goetz

 

The Remedy takes you through medical and literary history, right around the time the foundation was laid for modern medicine. Handwashing was controversial. Hospitals had open jars of ointment in the operating room, and surgeons would scoop out what they needed without washing their hands in between patients. This book made me thankful for germ theory. For basic hygiene. ForĀ vaccines!

I couldn’t wait to find out what happened next. I really got a feel for how relentless tuberculosis was, and how hopeless it seemed. Would the public be convinced of Koch’s findings? Would other scientists be swayed? I found this book to be absolutely riveting, and that surprised me when I considered it’s basically a non-fiction book about germs, medicine, and scientific research. But it reads in a narrative style, in layman’s terms; so it was enjoyable throughout, and I didn’t once feel bogged down.

The Arthur Conan Doyle connection was a teensy bit looser than I had hoped it would be, but it was an interesting angle nonetheless. I was impressed by how cutting-edge Sherlock Holmes’s forensic methods were for the time, and what a huge impact these novels had on the scientific community.